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Posted By Social Edge
On 2 September 2014 - 8:33pm

Last year, the government of Paraguay adopted a new way of measuring the state of the nation, called the Social Progress Index (SPI). Both government and business leaders were concerned that increased economic growth wasn’t improving the lives of ordinary Paraguayans fast enough. We saw no reason why a country that is growing so fast could not bring more benefits of economic progress to the poor.

But pursuing old measures of success, like GDP per capita, wasn’t getting us where we wanted to go as a country. We needed a way to measure real outcomes for people, not just the level of economic activity.

We adopted the SPI because it focuses directly on improving the things that matter most to people – basic human needs, the foundations of wellbeing and opportunity. ...more

On 2 September 2014 - 5:05pm

teamwork-383939_1280I find that so much of what is true ‘happiness’ in one’s job is how we conduct ourselves and our thinking.

For example, even if your job isn’t your exact ideal, there are elements that can bring full happiness. Being of service is not relegated to any one sector. Being professional, kind, courteous, and with a high “client service” attitude to external parties as well as to the internal team, can bring high “happiness” value.  Ideally, it should be coupled with sincere appreciation in return.  Regardless, it makes us feel happy to deliver sincere value. We hold a “high happiness quotient” in our own esteem for ourselves and how we are serving.

On the larger scale of trying to find something you love to do–I do think each ...more

Posted By Addictions UK
On 1 September 2014 - 9:00am

(This week's slogan) ...more

On 31 August 2014 - 9:49pm

reclaimed cokctailsLooking back, I have been an ‘entrepreneur’ for years.  People have also called me a business woman, leader, mum-preneur (oh, how I hate that word!) and intra-preneur (whatever the hell that is!) but mostly people have called me an entrepreneur and, more recently, a social entrepreneur.

I used to think this title was mainly to do with making money or starting up businesses.  Yet I noticed that it didn’t matter whether I was new to a business idea or place or if I had been in that space for years – people still called me an entrepreneur.  I guess it must be something more than the starting of businesses, it’s a mind-set, it’s written on your face and it’s imprinted into your DNA.

I know now though that being an ...more

Posted By Social Edge
On 30 August 2014 - 11:55pm

At the Lex Mundi Pro Bono Foundation we work with social entrepreneurs from around the world to help them identify their legal issues and access pro bono legal services. We see that social entrepreneurs often face the same legal issues and challenges that confront any entrepreneur.

One of the first questions that nascent social entrepreneurs typically confront is whether to form a legal entity and if so, where and in what form. In the past this was an easier question for social entrepreneurs to answer – given the lack of alternatives, they would either establish a traditional nonprofit corporation or form a for-profit enterprise. Thus, a social entrepreneur would either become dependent on charitable contributions or would organize as a for-profit entity in order ...more

On 29 August 2014 - 5:30pm

Blog5

Liquid is working hard.

That’s what happens when you try to set up shop, a complex online network, in Africa.

While facing unbelievable challenges, they are succeeding. In part, it’s doing business right. Which is effective CSR.

CSR is not just about philanthropy. It’s about treating everyone within your company and everyone without your company with excellence. That’s the first line of Corporate Social Responsibility — not a donation.

Here’s what a good-intentioned company can face. It’s the story of a courageous company called Liquid:

• 5-year legal battle to operate in Zimbabwe;

• 2 years to run cable;

• 18 months of negotiations;

• Cable nearly washed away by a river;

...more

Posted By Bubb’s blog
On 29 August 2014 - 11:21am

A recent storyin the Times, and picked up by the Daily Mail, highlights the attempts by the Charity Commission to make us declare spend on political campaigning.
It has been roundly criticised across the sector and I trust the Commission will now drop these proposals. We would be very happy to discuss with the Commission how we , as a sector,  can make our accounting more transparent and work with them on the trend towards impact reporting which demonstrates to the public the impact of their donations.
It's impact that matters , not the sterile reporting of where money is spent. This is where we can tell the story of what we do with the money we receive , whether from government contracts or from the public or corporate donors. We should have a common position with the regulator on ...more

On 28 August 2014 - 6:40pm

As I’ve found in my own experience, volunteering can be such a positive and valued experience for both the people helping, and the people who need the help. I’d love to share just some of the Positives I’ve observed for volunteers.

1- Be A Part of Something Greater. Often new volunteers find that the “product” — serving homeless people, helping microentrepreneurs, tutoring young mothers on their GEDs, is so meaningful that it’s hard to return to the corporate world. They feel a part of something greater, because it is so definitively clear how they are helping. We all want to feel we are caring for and helping others, and are part of a movement larger than ourselves.

2- Keep Your Skills Current. Use your current skills and ‘exercise’ them just as you would any muscle. Are you an attorney, administrative assistant, construction worker, public relations expert, manager? Put those needed skills to use, and expand them as you continue ...more

On 28 August 2014 - 3:19pm

“If we do not keep on speaking terms with children, we become merely machines for eating and earning money” John Updike Quoted in Arnold 2014 pg. 1 Over the last few weeks I have hosted a number of meetings with colleagues from East and West. Our Chinese friends came back to gain some more understanding […] ...more

Posted By Bubb’s blog
On 28 August 2014 - 9:19am

A recent article by my old friend David Brindle in the Guardian highlighted the problem we face in moving people with learning disabilities out of hospital into the community and reflects the background of the work we are doing on a commissioning framework in our NHS England steering group.
The problem we need to tackle is that more people with learning disabilities are being placed in hospitals like the one at the centre of the Winterbourne View scandal than are being moved out, despite a brave government commitment to move all people out of inappropriate inpatient facilities. Latest official figures released four weeks ago show that in the three months to the end of June, 358 people were admitted to so-called assessment and treatment units in England. Only 261 were discharged.
A subsequent review by the Government following the scandal concluded that personalised care and support in appropriate community settings is vital. There is a strong consensus around that aim. ...more